Don’t Get Tricked by Marketing (IT Toolbox Blogs)

Every day in my email I get a bunch of junk mail.  Somehow it makes it past our spam filters.  Marketers, all of whom want “just 10 minutes of my time.”  

 

Most of them are selling things that I don’t have any responsibility for, or ability to purchase.  My favorite is the person(s) in Kansas who want to invite me to some even in Kansas City.  I don’t live or work in Kansas (but my company is headquartered there).  

 

Normally I don’t open these kinds of email.  Just from a normal sense of security and phishing protection, it’s not smart.  My email client shows me the first few lines of the message, and I have learned to recognize the spam when I see it.  So off to the trash bin it goes.

 

In recent months I’ve noticed a real shift in the approach taken.  Rather than a hard product or service or leading with a wild and crazy claim that is too good to be true, or trying to tell me the world is about to end if I don’t act… Rather than these tried and true marketing approaches, more often than not, the emails sound like they were written by a real person.

 

A lot of times these emails are written in a series.  The second in line is the most insidious.  “Did you see my email last week?”  I get real mail like that all the time.  People are always asking me if I’ve followed up on something.  If I’m liable to be tripped up by something this is it.

 

Of course I always recognize the emails pretty quickly and do the normal routine on them.

 

But it feels different.  If feels like I’m saying “You suck” to a real person, not a nasty troll.  I used to like to punk these folks by pointing our holes in their assumptions.  I find myself wanting to be nice to this new generation of marketers.

 

Don’t get me wrong.  I’m not a softie and I don’t give in to it.  But it’s an interesting trend in approach.  If you aren’t paying really close attention (and who is when it comes to opening email?) you’ll find yourself on the phone with someone who wants to sell you consulting services, or oddball hardware components you don’t know how to use.

 

 

Source: SANS ISC SecNewsFeed @ February 22, 2017 at 11:22PM

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